To: Lifetime Networks/Tommy O'Haver, TV network/writer

Support the Columbine mini-series on Lifetime

Lifetime network has talked about developing a mini-series based on the Columbine High School Massacre. While no other word has been spoken, this certainly has drawn a lot of controversy by those who would rather not see nor re-live such a horrific event. But I believe it should be made, because what many don't seem to get is the fact that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were actually very troubled, disturbed kids who indeed needed help. Besides their psychological disorders, they were also one of the most bullied students in the school. There can be many other motives as to why they committed such a crime (ie narcissism), but I feel as though Lifetime will expose them well enough to make the audience understand what kind of people they were, and hopefully end up not hating them. The pair should be remembered, not in praise for their act, but in sympathy.
Yes, what they did was terrible, and I sympathize with the victims' families for their losses, but I am confident that if this gets adapted, it may raise awareness for youth violence and other troubles. More people need to understand what was going on with Eric and Dylan that drove them to their killing spree -- not the video games, not the music, not the movies, etc. And as Dylan's mother once said, after she learned about her deceased son's true distress, that's when she began doing all the research she could on suicide.
Thank you.

Why is this important?

In 1999, two teenagers rampaged their school and caused a deadly school shooting, killing 13 before themselves. Thirteen years later, Lifetime is now in talks of making a mini-series based on this event, and possibly exploring the two teens' lives prior, but many people are against it. I believe it should be made, for our generation's sake.

Category


Reasons for signing

  • I'm sick tired of lightly developed arguments on how videogames and music directly inspire violent acts among young people I'm forced to accept in my third world country. Despite that, focusing on the development of the protagonists' psychological state sounds promising.
  • omg please
  • I definitely agree that this needs to happen. It's so easy to dismiss Eric and Dylan as nothing but monsters without wanting to look at ourselves in the mirror and realizing that it's our society that created them.