To: Federal Communications Commission

Tell the FCC: Restore Net Neutrality

The D.C. Circuit’s decision in the Verizon vs. FCC case dealt a huge blow to the open Internet.

Right now there is no one protecting Internet users from ISPs that block or discriminate against websites, applications, or services. Companies like Verizon will now be able to block or slow down any website, application, or service they like. And they’ll be able to create tiered pricing structures with fast lanes for those who can afford the tolls and slow lanes for everyone else.

It’s time for the new FCC leadership to correct the agency’s past mistakes and to reassert the agency’s clear authority over our nation’s communications infrastructure. To preserve the open Internet, the FCC must reclassify broadband Internet access as a telecommunications service.

Use your authority to establish a solid legal footing for the vital policies and protections this court decision threatens.

Why is this important?

An appeals court just dealt the latest blow to the open Internet. The court struck down the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Order because of the questionable legal framework the agency used when it adopted its Net neutrality rules in 2010.

This ruling means there is no one who can protect us from ISPs that block or discriminate against websites, applications, or services.

But there’s hope: FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler can correct the agency’s past mistakes and truly protect our nation’s communications infrastructure. The agency must take the necessary steps to make broadband networks open, accessible, reliable, and affordable for everyone.

We need to tell the FCC to start treating broadband like a communications service, and to restore its Net neutrality rules.

Category

MoveOn Civic Action does not necessarily endorse the contents of petitions posted on this site. MoveOn Petitions is an open tool that anyone can use to post a petition advocating any point of view, so long as the petition does not violate our terms of service.