• Self-charged electric school buses with continuous climate control
    The more parents and school boards are vigorously demanding self-charged school buses the sooner school bus manufacturers would invest in developing and deploying practical proven self-charged electric school buses.
    11 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Gary Vesperman
  • Tell California officials: No drilling where we're living!
    Right now, more than 2 million Californians are living and breathing the toxic health impacts of oil and gas drilling sites in their neighborhoods. An end to chronic asthma and cancer in our neighborhoods is in sight. Just last month, Governor Gavin Newsom issued a draft regulation to stop new drilling within 3,200 feet of homes, hospitals, schools, and other sensitive receptors. Now, a 60 day comment period allows the public to raise our voices to: 1) SUPPORT the 3,200-foot setback for new wells 2) DEMAND that the setback rule applies to existing wells, not just new wells 3) URGE the Governor's administration and CalGEM to take emergency action to ban all new permits within the setback until the final rule is in effect.
    1,058 of 2,000 Signatures
  • Senators: No vote on the NDAA until we build back better!
    While the Biden administration has promised to take bold steps to reduce the United States’ carbon footprint and invest in clean energy, there’s one BIG piece of the puzzle that’s always missing from the conversation — the Pentagon. Here’s the thing: the Pentagon is one of the world’s BIGGEST polluters, churning out more greenhouse gas emissions than 140 countries combined. It’s only gotten worse since the start of the “War on Terror” — military activities in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Syria alone weigh in at over 400 MILLION metric tons of CO2. If we truly want to combat climate change we’ve got to shrink the U.S. war machine. But while infrastructure funding and a Build Back Better agenda that would invest in clean energy sit on the chopping block, a few powerful Senators are ready to ram through an astronomical $778 BILLION budget to fund *more* weapons and war. We need your help to make sure ALL our Senators hear our call: Focus on Build Back Better, not spending more on the Pentagon!
    177 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Stephen Miles Picture
  • Congress: Mold and Water-Damaged Buildings Are Affecting Our Public Health
    It's estimated that 47% of ALL U.S. homes have visible dampness and mold. People spend 90% of their time indoors, yet a lack of emphasis is put on indoor air quality and how that affects our health every day. The recent peer-reviewed medical journal “A Comprehensive Review of Mold Research Literature From 2011 – 2018” published in Internal Medicine Review concluded that 112 of 114 (98.2%) of epidemiological articles published between 2011 and 2018 supported the proposition that inhaled mold, mold fragments, toxins and various pathogenic inflammagen, or other components of the air in water-damaged buildings (WDB), cause single and multi-system illness in humans. Symptoms include chronic and daily manifestations of fatigue, pain, nonrestorative sleep, cognitive deficits, neuropathic pains, gastrointestinal issues, musculoskeletal compromise, post-exertional malaise, dermatological, ophthalmic, endocrine, and other chronic multisystem symptoms for those suffering. These studies included 273,000 subjects from over 30 countries and 5 continents! The time for adequate funding for research and awareness on this overlooked public health issue is long overdue.
    600 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Brandon Chappo
  • Keep Radioactive Fracking Waste Off the 3 Rivers!
    Active or Proposed Barging Sites along the Monongahela, Allegheny, and Ohio rivers: Monongahela River Mile 96.7, Star City near Morgantown, WV River Mile 43.5, Speers, near Belle Vernon, PA; Allegheny River Mile 29.6, Freeport, PA; Ohio River Mile 93.5, Comtech Industries Terminal at Bellaire, OH; River Mile 123.1, Hannibal, OH and offloading at River Mile 160, Enlink Midstream/Belles Run Terminal, Newport, OH and River Mile 173, Deep Rock Disposal Terminal, Marietta, OH. These sites would put the public's drinking water at risk of toxic fracking wastewater contamination. The exact composition of the wastewater is extremely difficult to obtain due to the fractured permitting process that allows the fracking industry to claim their chemical slurry as proprietary making it is near impossible to assess the full extent of the risks of barging the fracking wastewaters. Nevertheless, we do know some of the wastewater’s composition, including highly toxic metals, such as arsenic and barium, and volatile compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide and benzene. These components are known to cause serious health problems, including cancers and death. Moreover, these wastewaters often contain toxic levels of salt and the radioactive human carcinogen radium. In fact, some samples from the Marcellus Shale show levels of radium 3,600 times higher than EPA’s drinking water standard. Because of the known and unknown elements of the fracking wastewater, the primary concern of transporting produced water by barges are spills - both periodic spills that are likely to occur and catastrophic spills that could potentially occur. Spills can occur directly from the barges as well as at the loading and unloading facilities. Spills can occur due to inadequate equipment, human error, and uncontrollable external forces, such as extreme weather conditions. According to a PSE report released in August 2021, rising water levels during high rainfall or snowmelt events obscures riverbanks and disturbs or moves river sediments, altering the riverbed and challenging the river’s navigability. Furthermore, the report found that these events can create water currents that can pull vessels off course and/or throw debris into the vessel’s path, further increasing the risk of a toxic spill into the drinking water for millions of people, many of which are already facing inequitable living conditions, risking their long-term health and life expectancy. The USACE estimates that up to 50% more water could flow through the Ohio River watershed within this century due to climate change. PSE’s report also examined the USCG’s database on inland accidents and found that serious accidents are on the rise. The USCG defines serious accidents as incidents involving death or serious injury, excessive property damage, or a discharge of hazardous materials. In 2010, about 8% of incidents were serious. By 2018, serious incidents accounted for 12% of all accidents. Furthermore, when a spill does occur, it is unclear who is responsible for accident management and spill mitigation—especially since the contents of each barge are not disclosed. Fracking wastewater carried on barges is considered a hazardous material by the USCG even though it is exempted as a hazardous material by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Because this contradicts hazardous designation along with the undisclosed nature of the produced wastewater, holding polluters accountable will be challenging and at the costs of the local residents - from their taxpaying pockets and their long-term health. We do not want ANY oil and gas waste being transported along the Monongahela, Allegheny, and Ohio Rivers. Our towns and cities along these rivers get our drinking water from aquifers that are highly susceptible to river contamination, and we want to assure safe drinking water for current and future generations. We urge the United States Coast Guard and the United States Army Corps of Engineers to deny any authorizations. We ask you to deny and revoke any and all authorizations that might allow the transport of any fracking waste on our waters. To do otherwise demonstrates a callous disregard for protecting the public’s health and safety — a duty which you’ve solemnly sworn to uphold. In doing so, we thank you for protecting the health and safety of the residents that depend on these three rivers for their drinking water and recreation. For a full report on the known and expected impacts of barging fracking wastewater, see Rossi and Dominic DiGiulio (2021) https://bit.ly/3z8elyP.
    15,260 of 20,000 Signatures
    Created by Karen Feridun
  • Protect Puget Sound from Toxic Development
    Toxics from waste buried on site are leaching into groundwater aquifers threatening the public health, and contaminated stormwater is entering the ecologically sensitive watersheds of Green Cove and Butler Creeks, which drain into the federally impaired waters of Budd and Eld Inlets of Puget Sound, habitat for endangered Salmon and Orcas. The Squaxin Island tribe has provided comment that notes a development overlying these contaminated soils would make contamination of soil, water, wetlands and groundwater permanent, adversely affecting their treaty rights. This proposal has met with years of overwhelming public opposition, yet the City of Olympia continues to review it despite the Applicant's continued failure to comply with agreements to provide information to the City, the Department of Ecology, and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) which are needed to perform an adequate review. The Applicant, Jerry Mahan of John L. Scott Realty, has obtained numerous extensions of time to provide this data, but has failed or refused to do so, violating the terms of the agreement to obtain an extension. Therefore, by failing to comply with these agreements and the laws which require information that would allow consideration of adverse environmental impacts which are foreseeably likely to be leading from this project, Applicant is acting in bad faith. The City should inform Applicant that he has not performed pursuant to the terms of his agreement granting a 6 month extension, and the project can no longer be considered until a new complete application is submitted. We request that the City of Olympia return this application as incomplete and void, as required by the terms of the extension agreement. Any new application must provide the information required by the City, Ecology and DNR so that they can do their job to safeguard public health and the environment.
    95 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Grace Kronenberg
  • Endangered Bumblebee Needs Your Help BEFORE NOV. 1st to Save a Rare Prairie from the Bulldozer
    Our plants and animals are under grave threat as we face a 6th mass extinction. We are losing species 1000 to 10,000 times faster than we have in the past--and most of these extinctions are occurring due to human activities (like this airport expansion). We must do everything we can to protect important habitats like this--especially when there are alternatives. Save the bees and other pollinators. We are all connected.
    258 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Lisa Yee-Litzenberg
  • President Biden: We want a world free from nukes!
    Right now the Biden administration is in the middle of the “Nuclear Posture Review,” where they’ll assess and evaluate current [read: Trump’s] U.S. nuclear weapons policy. They hope to complete it by early next year, and that means right now we’ve got a narrow window to impact their findings. And although this president has long supported nonproliferation efforts, there are worrying signs that hawks inside the administration might succeed in keeping the dangerous status quo. That’s why we’re calling on activists like you. Together, let’s remind the Biden administration of the widespread public support to end nuclear weapons use and remove these deadly devices from the world. Add your name to Tell President Biden: We want a world free from nuclear weapons!
    21 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Stephen Miles Picture
  • Protect the Boundary Waters Wilderness from toxic copper mining
    The Boundary Waters Wilderness in northeastern Minnesota is America's most-visited Wilderness, a wildland refuge critical to people and the planet. This wild and beautiful place is threatened by proposed sulfide-ore copper mining, but we can protect this place if enough people take action. Visit www.SavetheBoundaryWaters.org to learn more.
    486 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Becky Rom
  • Reject Fossil Fuels and Build Back Fossil Free
    President Biden has the tools to create healthy communities, millions of good-paying jobs, and a better life for people on the frontlines of fossil fuel extraction, toxic pollution, and the climate crisis. Indigenous leaders and environmental justice activists have appealed to the White House to reject pipelines, drilling on federal lands, and other fossil fuel projects. We need to raise our voices and urge President Biden to keep his promises to take bold climate action and build back fossil free.
    15,898 of 20,000 Signatures
    Created by Food & Water Watch Picture
  • Costco needs to ditch plastic packaging
    Plastic containers like pop bottles can be recycled, they cannot be recycling infinitely. When plastic is recycled it requires "virgin plastic" to be turned into a new pop bottle. The other kind of plastic, the kind that you find wrapped around packages or what your produces comes in, is not recyclable. Additionally, the production of plastic has immense environmental impacts. According to the World Economic Forum, about 4-8% of annual global oil consumption is associated with plastics. In 2015, the CIEL reported that manufacturing polyethylene plastics are responsible for 184.3 to 213 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, which is about as much as 45 million passenger vehicles emit during one year. The data is clear; plastic is bad for our planet.
    108 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Meg McAloon
  • Path between Cedarwood/Utility and Aberdeen
    I am a parent of two students at Cushing Elementary (and two children who are future attendees of Cushing Elementary). Families in our neighborhood (along with families on First Parish and Country Way) use the path to access the high school sports complex and to walk to Cushing Elementary. We are too close to the school to quality for free busing, yet if the path didn't exist, our only way to walk to school puts young children on sidewalks within feet of busy roads. The path that connects Cedarwood/Utility to Aberdeen provides a safe way for residents to access the HS sports complex, Cushing school and provides shaded passage for walking and recreation. The path is a scenic wooded trail through wetlands and is an opportunity for residents to travel around Scituate by foot or by bike. Over the past several decades, the SHS cross country team has utilized this path for practices and for races. I've been told that the condition of the path is too poor for their continued use. The path is on town property and loosely maintained by the town of Scituate. It is plowed in the winter and mowed in fall and spring. Repaving this path ensures that children can safely walk and bike to school and older and younger residents alike can enjoy this route and move about town without walking along a main road. Please ask your friends and neighbors to support the reconstruction of this path.
    212 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Caroline Meehan